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U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Evan Romero, a 673d Security Forces Squadron operations support noncommissioned officer, simulates pulling over an impaired driver at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Jan. 15, 2019. For someone struggling with drugs or alcohol problems, JBER offers multiple programs and resources such as the Alcohol Drug Abuse Prevention and Treatment (ADAPT) program and Army Substance Abuse Program (ASAP), which can be reached at 580-2181 and 384-1412 respectively. Also, Joint Base Against Drunk Driving (JBADD), which offers rides to people who have been drinking and need a safe drive home, can be reached at 907-384-7433.
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Evan Romero, a 673d Security Forces Squadron operations support noncommissioned officer, simulates pulling over an impaired driver at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Jan. 15, 2019. For someone struggling with drugs or alcohol problems, JBER offers multiple programs and resources such as the Alcohol Drug Abuse Prevention and Treatment (ADAPT) program and Army Substance Abuse Program (ASAP), which can be reached at 580-2181 and 384-1412 respectively. Also, Joint Base Against Drunk Driving (JBADD), which offers rides to people who have been drinking and need a safe drive home, can be reached at 907-384-7433.
Latisha Boyd, a Sitka Child Development Center child and youth program assistant, teaches children to sit and eat at a table during meal time at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Dec. 14, 2018. All five JBER CDC centers are accredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children and provide childcare for ages 6 weeks to 5 years. Due to a shortage in workers JBER is hiring child development center workers – including teachers, cooks and food service workers.
Becky Chappell, a Sitka Child Development Center child and youth program assistant, covers a child with a blanket during nap time at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Dec. 14, 2018. All five JBER CDC centers are accredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children and provide childcare for ages 6 weeks to 5 years. Due to a shortage in workers JBER is hiring child development center workers – including teachers, cooks and food service workers.
Nelia McKeown, a Sitka Child Development Center child and youth program assistant, gives children toys to play with during playtime at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Dec. 14, 2018. All five JBER CDC centers are accredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children and provide childcare for ages 6 weeks to 5 years. Due to a shortage in workers JBER is hiring child development center workers – including teachers, cooks and food service workers.
Nelia McKeown, a Sitka Child Development Center child and youth program assistant, holds a child during playtime at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Dec. 14, 2018. All five JBER CDC centers are accredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children and provide childcare for ages 6 weeks to 5 years. Due to a shortage in workers JBER is hiring child development center workers – including teachers, cooks and food service workers.
Aaron Bryant and Rick Gill, 773d CES utilities operators, assemble a 300-foot section of insulated pipe at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Dec. 1, 2018.  Following the Nov. 30, 2018, earthquake, the Alaska Mission Operations Center suffered a water main break. Due to the long-term cold weather, a temporary solution was decided upon. The innovative thoughts and immediate actions of a handful of Airmen ensured the Alaska Mission Operations Center had water within two days, and saved the U.S. Air Force almost $20,000.
Members of the 773d Civil Engineer Squadron utilities shop assemble a 300-foot section of insulated pipe at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Dec. 1, 2018.  Following the Nov. 30, 2018, earthquake, the Alaska Mission Operations Center suffered a water main break. Due to the long-term cold weather, a temporary solution was decided upon. The innovative thoughts and immediate actions of a handful of Airmen ensured the Alaska Mission Operations Center had water within two days, and saved the U.S. Air Force almost $20,000.
Members of the 773d Civil Engineer Squadron utilities shop assemble a 300-foot section of insulated pipe at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Dec. 1, 2018.  Following the Nov. 30, 2018, earthquake, the Alaska Mission Operations Center suffered a water main break. Due to the long-term cold weather, a temporary solution was decided upon. The innovative thoughts and immediate actions of a handful of Airmen ensured the Alaska Mission Operations Center had water within two days, and saved the U.S. Air Force almost $20,000.
U.S. Brigadier General Darrin Slaten, commander of the 176th Wing, Alaska Air National Guard, joined by U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Shawn Landon, presents U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Daniel Randolph The Alaska Humanitarian Service Medal during a ceremony at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska Jan. 9, 2019. Randolph was awarded the medal for exceptional response after witnessing a para-gliding accident on March 10, 2018 while hiking. Randolph assumed personal risk to reach the pilot by climbing an ice laden cliff and provided immediate aid by fashioning a sling, he was also able to grab the pilot’s gear, guide the pilot down the cliff as well as the Butte Trail.
U.S. Air Force Staff. Sgt. Charles Danowski, a 673d Medical Support Squadron medical laboratory technician, cleans his the lens on his M50 series protective mask during a newly-implemented chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense training course at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Jan. 8, 2019. One of the key changes made embraces the reintegration of hands-on, in-person instruction, and reduces computer based training, allowing Airmen to receive a more tailored learning experience.
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Richard Blackburn, 773d CES Emergency Management chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) instructor shows Tech. Sgt. Kasama Slaton, 673d Medical Operations Squadron, how to identify exposures risks to Senior Airman Kolbe Kleinschnitz, 3rd Maintenance Squadron, during a newly-implemented CBRN defense training course at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Jan. 8, 2019. One of the key changes made embraces the reintegration of hands-on, in-person instruction, and reduces computer based training, allowing Airmen to receive a more tailored learning experience. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Crystal A. Jenkins)
U.S. Air Force Master. Sgt. Joseph Connolly, 732nd Air Mobility Squadron superintendent of air freight operations, directs classmates on proper procedures during a newly-implemented chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense training course drill at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Jan. 8, 2019. One of the key changes made embraces the reintegration of hands-on, in-person instruction, and reduces computer based training, allowing Airmen to receive a more tailored learning experience. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Crystal A. Jenkins)
U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Michael Smith, 3rd Air Support Operations Squadron superintendent, directs classmates on proper placement of M-8 paper during a newly-implemented chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense training course drill at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Jan. 8, 2019. One of the key changes made embraces the reintegration of hands-on, in-person instruction, and reduces computer based training, allowing Airmen to receive a more tailored learning experience. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Crystal A. Jenkins)
U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. John Fallesgon, 673d Force Support Squadron Fitness Assessment Cell noncommissioned officer in charge, directs classmates on what to write on M-8 paper during a newly-implemented chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense training course drill at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Jan. 8, 2019. One of the key changes made embraces the reintegration of hands-on, in-person instruction, and reduces computer based training, allowing Airmen to receive a more tailored learning experience. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Crystal A. Jenkins)
A group of U.S. Air Force Airmen place M-8 paper on a simulated piece of equipment during a newly-implemented chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense training course exercise at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Jan. 8, 2019. One of the key changes made embraces the reintegration of hands-on, in-person instruction, and reduces computer based training, allowing Airmen to receive a more tailored learning experience. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Crystal A. Jenkins)
U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. John Fallesgon, 673d Force Support Squadron Fitness Assessment Cell noncommissioned officer in charge, writes on M-8 paper during a newly-implemented chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense training course exercise at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Jan. 8, 2019. One of the key changes made embraces the reintegration of hands-on, in-person instruction, and reduces computer based training, allowing Airmen to receive a more tailored learning experience. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Crystal A. Jenkins)
A group of U.S. Air Force Airmen seek shelter during a newly-implemented chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense training course exercise at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Jan. 8, 2019. One of the key changes made embraces the reintegration of hands-on, in-person instruction, and reduces computer based training, allowing Airmen to receive a more tailored learning experience. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Crystal A. Jenkins)
U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. John Fallesgon, 673d Force Support Squadron Fitness Assessment Cell noncommissioned officer in charge, evaluates M-8 paper during a newly-implemented chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense training course at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Jan. 8, 2019. One of the key changes made embraces the reintegration of hands-on, in-person instruction, and reduces computer based training, allowing Airmen to receive a more tailored learning experience. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Crystal A. Jenkins)
A group of U.S. Air Force Airmen cordon an area after a simulated initial release during a newly-implemented chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense training course exercise at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Jan. 8, 2019. One of the key changes made embraces the reintegration of hands-on, in-person instruction, and reduces computer based training, allowing Airmen to receive a more tailored learning experience. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Crystal A. Jenkins)