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JBER kicks off 2018 Combined Federal Campaign “Show some love”

By Airman 1st Class Crystal A. Jenkins | JBER Public Affairs | Sept. 27, 2018

JOINT BASE ELMENDORF-RICHARDSON, Alaska —

This year’s Combined Federal Campaign, is scheduled to kick off Oct. 1, and its theme “Show Some Love,” although unchanged from last year, has made some recent campaign enhancements.

“The CFC is the world’s largest campaign and is the official workplace giving campaign of the federal government,” said U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Amanda Defazio, the installation CFC coordinator. “Since the campaign’s start in 1961, federal employees have donated more than $8.3 billion. We are hoping this year service members will find a more user-friendly, centralized giving platform and receive the help they might need through one of our key workers.”

 At Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, more than 125 dedicated key workers from the Air Force and Army are embedded within units to provide information and assist with those desiring to contribute.

“As service members, no matter what branch we choose to serve in, we pledged to do all we can to protect our country and its people, not only during conflicts but here at home as well,” said Sgt. 1st Class Larry C. Streeper Jr., U.S. Army Alaska CFC coordinator. “We must reach out to those who need our help and do all we can to pick them up during hard times.”

The CFC program provides a way to help others almost anywhere. By donating through the CFC, individuals can trust the money donated is going to the cause they choose and that the money is going to charity.

Beginning last year, cash is no longer accepted as a donation option. Arctic warriors, their families and retirees can provide a helping hand - donating by payroll deduction, credit card, check, and even by volunteering hours.

“Some people may only be able to afford to donate what they believe to be a small amount and feel as if it won’t make an impact or change anything,” Streeper said. “What they don’t realize is that small donations make a great impact with the CFC. One example is a case of water normally costing around five dollars. Because these charities buy in such great quantities, they are able to get four cases of water for five dollars making your donation reach that much further.”

For those who desire to give but can’t financially contribute at this time, may want to consider the donation of volunteer hours. Since last year, the program allows individuals to register the amount of time spent volunteering with agencies on the website.

“You can’t put a monetary value on the face-to-face interaction that volunteering provides,” Defazio said. “There are so many local charities and the need is all around us if we look.”

For participants who wish to contribute financially, they must pick specific charities for their donation to benefit.  Though checks will be made out to CFC, a charity code must be entered on the donation form or the web site.  This year, any amount of contribution can be divided up without limit as opposed to 10 in the past.

“We need to continuously build up our communities, both our temporary communities and our hometown communities, and the CFC provides that ability,” Streeper said. “We need to leave the world a better place than when we found it.”

For more information, or to donate to the CFC, go to www.opm.gov/ShowSomeLoveCFC or see your unit representative.